.RU

Chapter 43 - Джейн Остин Гордость и предубеждение

Chapter 43




Глава 43



Elizabeth, as they drove along, watched for the first appearance of Pemberley Woods with some perturbation; and when at length they turned in at the lodge, her spirits were in a high flutter.
The park was very large, and contained great variety of ground. They entered it in one of its lowest points, and drove for some time through a beautiful wood stretching over a wide extent.
Elizabeth's mind was too full for conversation, but she saw and admired every remarkable spot and point of view. They gradually ascended for half-a-mile, and then found themselves at the top of a considerable eminence, where the wood ceased, and the eye was instantly caught by Pemberley House, situated on the opposite side of a valley, into which the road with some abruptness wound.

It was a large, handsome stone building, standing well on rising ground, and backed by a ridge of high woody hills; and in front, a stream of some natural importance was swelled into greater, but without any artificial appearance. Its banks were neither formal nor falsely adorned. Elizabeth was delighted. She had never seen a place for which nature had done more, or where natural beauty had been so little counteracted by an awkward taste. They were all of them warm in their admiration; and at that moment she felt that to be mistress of Pemberley might be something!
They descended the hill, crossed the bridge, and drove to the door; and, while examining the nearer aspect of the house, all her apprehension of meeting its owner returned. She dreaded lest the chambermaid had been mistaken. On applying to see the place, they were admitted into the hall; and Elizabeth, as they waited for the housekeeper, had leisure to wonder at her being where she was.
The housekeeper came; a respectable-looking elderly woman, much less fine, and more civil, than she had any notion of finding her. They followed her into the dining-parlour. It was a large, well proportioned room, handsomely fitted up. Elizabeth, after slightly surveying it, went to a window to enjoy its prospect. The hill, crowned with wood, which they had descended, receiving increased abruptness from the distance, was a beautiful object. Every disposition of the ground was good; and she looked on the whole scene, the river, the trees scattered on its banks and the winding of the valley, as far as she could trace it, with delight.

As they passed into other rooms these objects were taking different positions; but from every window there were beauties to be seen. The rooms were lofty and handsome, and their furniture suitable to the fortune of its proprietor; but Elizabeth saw, with admiration of his taste, that it was neither gaudy nor uselessly fine; with less of splendour, and more real elegance, than the furniture of Rosings.
"And of this place," thought she, "I might have been mistress! With these rooms I might now have been familiarly acquainted! Instead of viewing them as a stranger, I might have rejoiced in them as my own, and welcomed to them as visitors my uncle and aunt. But no,"—recollecting herself—"that could never be; my uncle and aunt would have been lost to me; I should not have been allowed to invite them."

This was a lucky recollection—it saved her from something very like regret.
She longed to inquire of the housekeeper whether her master was really absent, but had not the courage for it. At length however, the question was asked by her uncle; and she turned away with alarm, while Mrs. Reynolds replied that he was, adding,
"But we expect him to-morrow, with a large party of friends."
How rejoiced was Elizabeth that their own journey had not by any circumstance been delayed a day!
Her aunt now called her to look at a picture. She approached and saw the likeness of Mr. Wickham, suspended, amongst several other miniatures, over the mantelpiece. Her aunt asked her, smilingly, how she liked it. The housekeeper came forward, and told them it was a picture of a young gentleman, the son of her late master's steward, who had been brought up by him at his own expense.

"He is now gone into the army," she added; "but I am afraid he has turned out very wild."
Mrs. Gardiner looked at her niece with a smile, but Elizabeth could not return it.
"And that," said Mrs. Reynolds, pointing to another of the miniatures, "is my master—and very like him. It was drawn at the same time as the other—about eight years ago."
"I have heard much of your master's fine person," said Mrs. Gardiner, looking at the picture; "it is a handsome face. But, Lizzy, you can tell us whether it is like or not."

Mrs. Reynolds respect for Elizabeth seemed to increase on this intimation of her knowing her master.
"Does that young lady know Mr. Darcy?"
Elizabeth coloured, and said: "A little."
"And do not you think him a very handsome gentleman, ma'am?"
"Yes, very handsome."
"I am sure I know none so handsome; but in the gallery upstairs you will see a finer, larger picture of him than this. This room was my late master's favourite room, and these miniatures are just as they used to be then. He was very fond of them."
This accounted to Elizabeth for Mr. Wickham's being among them.
Mrs. Reynolds then directed their attention to one of Miss Darcy, drawn when she was only eight years old.
"And is Miss Darcy as handsome as her brother?" said Mrs. Gardiner.
"Oh! yes—the handsomest young lady that ever was seen; and so accomplished!—She plays and sings all day long. In the next room is a new instrument just come down for her—a present from my master; she comes here to-morrow with him."
Mr. Gardiner, whose manners were very easy and pleasant, encouraged her communicativeness by his questions and remarks; Mrs. Reynolds, either by pride or attachment, had evidently great pleasure in talking of her master and his sister.
"Is your master much at Pemberley in the course of the year?"
"Not so much as I could wish, sir; but I dare say he may spend half his time here; and Miss Darcy is always down for the summer months."
"Except," thought Elizabeth, "when she goes to Ramsgate."
"If your master would marry, you might see more of him."
"Yes, sir; but I do not know when THAT will be. I do not know who is good enough for him."
Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner smiled. Elizabeth could not help saying,
"It is very much to his credit, I am sure, that you should think so."
"I say no more than the truth, and everybody will say that knows him," replied the other.
Elizabeth thought this was going pretty far; and she listened with increasing astonishment as the housekeeper added, "I have never known a cross word from him in my life, and I have known him ever since he was four years old."

This was praise, of all others most extraordinary, most opposite to her ideas. That he was not a good-tempered man had been her firmest opinion. Her keenest attention was awakened; she longed to hear more, and was grateful to her uncle for saying:
"There are very few people of whom so much can be said. You are lucky in having such a master."
"Yes, sir, I know I am. If I were to go through the world, I could not meet with a better. But I have always observed, that they who are good-natured when children, are good-natured when they grow up; and he was always the sweetest-tempered, most generous-hearted boy in the world."
Elizabeth almost stared at her.
"Can this be Mr. Darcy?" thought she.
"His father was an excellent man," said Mrs. Gardiner.
"Yes, ma'am, that he was indeed; and his son will be just like him—just as affable to the poor."
Elizabeth listened, wondered, doubted, and was impatient for more. Mrs. Reynolds could interest her on no other point. She related the subjects of the pictures, the dimensions of the rooms, and the price of the furniture, in vain, Mr. Gardiner, highly amused by the kind of family prejudice to which he attributed her excessive commendation of her master, soon led again to the subject; and she dwelt with energy on his many merits as they proceeded together up the great staircase.
"He is the best landlord, and the best master," said she, "that ever lived; not like the wild young men nowadays, who think of nothing but themselves. There is not one of his tenants or servants but will give him a good name. Some people call him proud; but I am sure I never saw anything of it. To my fancy, it is only because he does not rattle away like other young men."
"In what an amiable light does this place him!" thought Elizabeth.
"This fine account of him," whispered her aunt as they walked, "is not quite consistent with his behaviour to our poor friend."
"Perhaps we might be deceived."
"That is not very likely; our authority was too good."
On reaching the spacious lobby above they were shown into a very pretty sitting-room, lately fitted up with greater elegance and lightness than the apartments below; and were informed that it was but just done to give pleasure to Miss Darcy, who had taken a liking to the room when last at Pemberley.
"He is certainly a good brother," said Elizabeth, as she walked towards one of the windows.
Mrs. Reynolds anticipated Miss Darcy's delight, when she should enter the room.
"And this is always the way with him," she added. "Whatever can give his sister any pleasure is sure to be done in a moment. There is nothing he would not do for her."
The picture-gallery, and two or three of the principal bedrooms, were all that remained to be shown. In the former were many good paintings; but Elizabeth knew nothing of the art; and from such as had been already visible below, she had willingly turned to look at some drawings of Miss Darcy's, in crayons, whose subjects were usually more interesting, and also more intelligible.
In the gallery there were many family portraits, but they could have little to fix the attention of a stranger. Elizabeth walked in quest of the only face whose features would be known to her. At last it arrested her—and she beheld a striking resemblance to Mr. Darcy, with such a smile over the face as she remembered to have sometimes seen when he looked at her. She stood several minutes before the picture, in earnest contemplation, and returned to it again before they quitted the gallery. Mrs. Reynolds informed them that it had been taken in his father's lifetime.

There was certainly at this moment, in Elizabeth's mind, a more gentle sensation towards the original than she had ever felt at the height of their acquaintance. The commendation bestowed on him by Mrs. Reynolds was of no trifling nature. What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant?
As a brother, a landlord, a master, she considered how many people's happiness were in his guardianship!—how much of pleasure or pain was it in his power to bestow!—how much of good or evil must be done by him! Every idea that had been brought forward by the housekeeper was favourable to his character, and as she stood before the canvas on which he was represented, and fixed his eyes upon herself, she thought of his regard with a deeper sentiment of gratitude than it had ever raised before; she remembered its warmth, and softened its impropriety of expression.
When all of the house that was open to general inspection had been seen, they returned downstairs, and, taking leave of the housekeeper, were consigned over to the gardener, who met them at the hall-door.
As they walked across the hall towards the river, Elizabeth turned back to look again; her uncle and aunt stopped also, and while the former was conjecturing as to the date of the building, the owner of it himself suddenly came forward from the road, which led behind it to the stables.
They were within twenty yards of each other, and so abrupt was his appearance, that it was impossible to avoid his sight. Their eyes instantly met, and the cheeks of both were overspread with the deepest blush. He absolutely started, and for a moment seemed immovable from surprise; but shortly recovering himself, advanced towards the party, and spoke to Elizabeth, if not in terms of perfect composure, at least of perfect civility.
She had instinctively turned away; but stopping on his approach, received his compliments with an embarrassment impossible to be overcome. Had his first appearance, or his resemblance to the picture they had just been examining, been insufficient to assure the other two that they now saw Mr. Darcy, the gardener's expression of surprise, on beholding his master, must immediately have told it.

They stood a little aloof while he was talking to their niece, who, astonished and confused, scarcely dared lift her eyes to his face, and knew not what answer she returned to his civil inquiries after her family. Amazed at the alteration of his manner since they last parted, every sentence that he uttered was increasing her embarrassment; and every idea of the impropriety of her being found there recurring to her mind, the few minutes in which they continued were some of the most uncomfortable in her life.
Nor did he seem much more at ease; when he spoke, his accent had none of its usual sedateness; and he repeated his inquiries as to the time of her having left Longbourn, and of her having stayed in Derbyshire, so often, and in so hurried a way, as plainly spoke the distraction of his thoughts.
At length every idea seemed to fail him; and, after standing a few moments without saying a word, he suddenly recollected himself, and took leave.
The others then joined her, and expressed admiration of his figure; but Elizabeth heard not a word, and wholly engrossed by her own feelings, followed them in silence. She was overpowered by shame and vexation.
Her coming there was the most unfortunate, the most ill-judged thing in the world! How strange it must appear to him! In what a disgraceful light might it not strike so vain a man! It might seem as if she had purposely thrown herself in his way again! Oh! why did she come? Or, why did he thus come a day before he was expected?

Had they been only ten minutes sooner, they should have been beyond the reach of his discrimination; for it was plain that he was that moment arrived—that moment alighted from his horse or his carriage. She blushed again and again over the perverseness of the meeting. And his behaviour, so strikingly altered—what could it mean? That he should even speak to her was amazing!—but to speak with such civility, to inquire after her family!

Never in her life had she seen his manners so little dignified, never had he spoken with such gentleness as on this unexpected meeting. What a contrast did it offer to his last address in Rosings Park, when he put his letter into her hand! She knew not what to think, or how to account for it.
They had now entered a beautiful walk by the side of the water, and every step was bringing forward a nobler fall of ground, or a finer reach of the woods to which they were approaching; but it was some time before Elizabeth was sensible of any of it; and, though she answered mechanically to the repeated appeals of her uncle and aunt, and seemed to direct her eyes to such objects as they pointed out, she distinguished no part of the scene.
Her thoughts were all fixed on that one spot of Pemberley House, whichever it might be, where Mr. Darcy then was. She longed to know what at the moment was passing in his mind—in what manner he thought of her, and whether, in defiance of everything, she was still dear to him. Perhaps he had been civil only because he felt himself at ease; yet there had been THAT in his voice which was not like ease. Whether he had felt more of pain or of pleasure in seeing her she could not tell, but he certainly had not seen her with composure.

At length, however, the remarks of her companions on her absence of mind aroused her, and she felt the necessity of appearing more like herself.
They entered the woods, and bidding adieu to the river for a while, ascended some of the higher grounds; when, in spots where the opening of the trees gave the eye power to wander, were many charming views of the valley, the opposite hills, with the long range of woods overspreading many, and occasionally part of the stream. Mr. Gardiner expressed a wish of going round the whole park, but feared it might be beyond a walk.
With a triumphant smile they were told that it was ten miles round. It settled the matter; and they pursued the accustomed circuit; which brought them again, after some time, in a descent among hanging woods, to the edge of the water, and one of its narrowest parts. They crossed it by a simple bridge, in character with the general air of the scene; it was a spot less adorned than any they had yet visited; and the valley, here contracted into a glen, allowed room only for the stream, and a narrow walk amidst the rough coppice-wood which bordered it. Elizabeth longed to explore its windings; but when they had crossed the bridge, and perceived their distance from the house, Mrs. Gardiner, who was not a great walker, could go no farther, and thought only of returning to the carriage as quickly as possible.
Her niece was, therefore, obliged to submit, and they took their way towards the house on the opposite side of the river, in the nearest direction; but their progress was slow, for Mr. Gardiner, though seldom able to indulge the taste, was very fond of fishing, and was so much engaged in watching the occasional appearance of some trout in the water, and talking to the man about them, that he advanced but little.
Whilst wandering on in this slow manner, they were again surprised, and Elizabeth's astonishment was quite equal to what it had been at first, by the sight of Mr. Darcy approaching them, and at no great distance. The walk here being here less sheltered than on the other side, allowed them to see him before they met. Elizabeth, however astonished, was at least more prepared for an interview than before, and resolved to appear and to speak with calmness, if he really intended to meet them.
For a few moments, indeed, she felt that he would probably strike into some other path. The idea lasted while a turning in the walk concealed him from their view; the turning past, he was immediately before them.

With a glance, she saw that he had lost none of his recent civility; and, to imitate his politeness, she began, as they met, to admire the beauty of the place; but she had not got beyond the words "delightful," and "charming," when some unlucky recollections obtruded, and she fancied that praise of Pemberley from her might be mischievously construed. Her colour changed, and she said no more.
Mrs. Gardiner was standing a little behind; and on her pausing, he asked her if she would do him the honour of introducing him to her friends. This was a stroke of civility for which she was quite unprepared; and she could hardly suppress a smile at his being now seeking the acquaintance of some of those very people against whom his pride had revolted in his offer to herself.
"What will be his surprise," thought she, "when he knows who they are? He takes them now for people of fashion."
The introduction, however, was immediately made; and as she named their relationship to herself, she stole a sly look at him, to see how he bore it, and was not without the expectation of his decamping as fast as he could from such disgraceful companions. That he was SURPRISED by the connection was evident; he sustained it, however, with fortitude, and so far from going away, turned his back with them, and entered into conversation with Mr. Gardiner.
Elizabeth could not but be pleased, could not but triumph. It was consoling that he should know she had some relations for whom there was no need to blush. She listened most attentively to all that passed between them, and gloried in every expression, every sentence of her uncle, which marked his intelligence, his taste, or his good manners.

The conversation soon turned upon fishing; and she heard Mr. Darcy invite him, with the greatest civility, to fish there as often as he chose while he continued in the neighbourhood, offering at the same time to supply him with fishing tackle, and pointing out those parts of the stream where there was usually most sport. Mrs. Gardiner, who was walking arm-in-arm with Elizabeth, gave her a look expressive of wonder.
Elizabeth said nothing, but it gratified her exceedingly; the compliment must be all for herself. Her astonishment, however, was extreme, and continually was she repeating,

"Why is he so altered? From what can it proceed? It cannot be for ME—it cannot be for MY sake that his manners are thus softened. My reproofs at Hunsford could not work such a change as this. It is impossible that he should still love me."
After walking some time in this way, the two ladies in front, the two gentlemen behind, on resuming their places, after descending to the brink of the river for the better inspection of some curious water-plant, there chanced to be a little alteration. It originated in Mrs. Gardiner, who, fatigued by the exercise of the morning, found Elizabeth's arm inadequate to her support, and consequently preferred her husband's. Mr. Darcy took her place by her niece, and they walked on together.

After a short silence, the lady first spoke. She wished him to know that she had been assured of his absence before she came to the place, and accordingly began by observing, that his arrival had been very unexpected—
"for your housekeeper," she added, "informed us that you would certainly not be here till to-morrow; and indeed, before we left Bakewell, we understood that you were not immediately expected in the country."
He acknowledged the truth of it all, and said that business with his steward had occasioned his coming forward a few hours before the rest of the party with whom he had been travelling.
"They will join me early to-morrow," he continued, "and among them are some who will claim an acquaintance with you—Mr. Bingley and his sisters."
Elizabeth answered only by a slight bow. Her thoughts were instantly driven back to the time when Mr. Bingley's name had been the last mentioned between them; and, if she might judge by his complexion, HIS mind was not very differently engaged.
"There is also one other person in the party," he continued after a pause, "who more particularly wishes to be known to you. Will you allow me, or do I ask too much, to introduce my sister to your acquaintance during your stay at Lambton?"
The surprise of such an application was great indeed; it was too great for her to know in what manner she acceded to it. She immediately felt that whatever desire Miss Darcy might have of being acquainted with her must be the work of her brother, and, without looking farther, it was satisfactory; it was gratifying to know that his resentment had not made him think really ill of her.
They now walked on in silence, each of them deep in thought. Elizabeth was not comfortable; that was impossible; but she was flattered and pleased. His wish of introducing his sister to her was a compliment of the highest kind. They soon outstripped the others, and when they had reached the carriage, Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner were half a quarter of a mile behind.

He then asked her to walk into the house—but she declared herself not tired, and they stood together on the lawn. At such a time much might have been said, and silence was very awkward. She wanted to talk, but there seemed to be an embargo on every subject. At last she recollected that she had been travelling, and they talked of Matlock and Dove Dale with great perseverance. Yet time and her aunt moved slowly—and her patience and her ideas were nearly worn our before the tete-a-tete was over.
On Mr. and Mrs. Gardiner's coming up they were all pressed to go into the house and take some refreshment; but this was declined, and they parted on each side with utmost politeness. Mr. Darcy handed the ladies into the carriage; and when it drove off, Elizabeth saw him walking slowly towards the house.
The observations of her uncle and aunt now began; and each of them pronounced him to be infinitely superior to anything they had expected.
"He is perfectly well behaved, polite, and unassuming," said her uncle.
"There IS something a little stately in him, to be sure," replied her aunt, "but it is confined to his air, and is not unbecoming. I can now say with the housekeeper, that though some people may call him proud, I have seen nothing of it."
"I was never more surprised than by his behaviour to us. It was more than civil; it was really attentive; and there was no necessity for such attention. His acquaintance with Elizabeth was very trifling."

"To be sure, Lizzy," said her aunt, "he is not so handsome as Wickham; or, rather, he has not Wickham's countenance, for his features are perfectly good. But how came you to tell me that he was so disagreeable?"
Elizabeth excused herself as well as she could; said that she had liked him better when they had met in Kent than before, and that she had never seen him so pleasant as this morning.

"But perhaps he may be a little whimsical in his civilities," replied her uncle. "Your great men often are; and therefore I shall not take him at his word, as he might change his mind another day, and warn me off his grounds."
Elizabeth felt that they had entirely misunderstood his character, but said nothing.
"From what we have seen of him," continued Mrs. Gardiner, "I really should not have thought that he could have behaved in so cruel a way by anybody as he has done by poor Wickham. He has not an ill-natured look. On the contrary, there is something pleasing about his mouth when he speaks. And there is something of dignity in his countenance that would not give one an unfavourable idea of his heart. But, to be sure, the good lady who showed us his house did give him a most flaming character! I could hardly help laughing aloud sometimes. But he is a liberal master, I suppose, and THAT in the eye of a servant comprehends every virtue."
Elizabeth here felt herself called on to say something in vindication of his behaviour to Wickham; and therefore gave them to understand, in as guarded a manner as she could, that by what she had heard from his relations in Kent, his actions were capable of a very different construction; and that his character was by no means so faulty, nor Wickham's so amiable, as they had been considered in Hertfordshire. In confirmation of this, she related the particulars of all the pecuniary transactions in which they had been connected, without actually naming her authority, but stating it to be such as such as might be relied on.
Mrs. Gardiner was surprised and concerned; but as they were now approaching the scene of her former pleasures, every idea gave way to the charm of recollection; and she was too much engaged in pointing out to her husband all the interesting spots in its environs to think of anything else. Fatigued as she had been by the morning's walk they had no sooner dined than she set off again in quest of her former acquaintance, and the evening was spent in the satisfactions of a intercourse renewed after many years' discontinuance.

The occurrences of the day were too full of interest to leave Elizabeth much attention for any of these new friends; and she could do nothing but think, and think with wonder, of Mr. Darcy's civility, and, above all, of his wishing her to be acquainted with his sister.

Ожидая появления Пемберлейского леса, Элизабет всматривалась в дорогу с большим волнением. И когда, миновав сторожку, они наконец свернули в усадьбу, возбуждение ее дошло до предела.
Отдельные части обширного парка составляли весьма разнообразную картину. Начав осмотр с одного из его самых низменных мест, они некоторое время ехали по красивой, широко раскинувшейся роще.
Хотя Элизабет была настолько взволнована, что ей трудно было участвовать в разговоре, она любовалась каждым приветливым уголком и каждым красивым видом. На протяжении полумили они медленно поднимались и в конце концов внезапно выехали на свободную от леса возвышенность, с которой широко открывался вид на долину с господским домом, стоявшим на ее противоположном краю.
Это было величественное каменное здание, удачно расположенное на склоне гряды лесистых холмов. Протекавший в долине полноводный ручей без заметных искусственных сооружений превращался перед домом в более широкий поток, берега которого не казались излишне строгими или чрезмерно ухоженными. Элизабет была в восторге. Никогда еще она не видела места, которое было бы более щедро одарено природой и в котором естественная красота была так мало испорчена недостаточным человеческим вкусом. Все были единодушны в своем восхищении. В этот момент она вполне оценила, что значило бы стать владелицей Пемберли!
Они спустились в долину, проехали по мосту и приблизились к дому. И когда она стала его рассматривать, стоя под его стенами, в ней снова проснулся страх, как бы ей не пришлось встретиться с его владельцем. Ей не давала покоя мысль, что горничная в гостинице могла ошибиться. После того как они попросили разрешения осмотреть дом, их пригласили в вестибюль. И, пока они ожидали домоправительницу, Элизабет могла вполне надивиться тому, куда ее привела судьба.
Домоправительница появилась. Это была почтенная пожилая женщина, гораздо менее чинная и более приветливая, чем можно было судить по первому впечатлению. Гости последовали за ней в столовую - просторную комнату с удачными пропорциями и изящным убранством. Окинув ее взглядом, Элизабет подошла к окну, чтобы полюбоваться открывшимся из него видом. Увенчанный лесом холм, с которого они только что спустились, издали казавшийся более крутым, чем вблизи, представлял прекрасное зрелище. Все вокруг радовало глаз, и Элизабет с наслаждением рассматривала пейзаж: реку, разбросанные по берегам деревья и изгибы терявшейся у горизонта долины.
Пока они проходили по другим комнатам, ландшафт менялся, но из каждого окна было чем полюбоваться. В комнатах были высокие потолки и богатая обстановка, достойная владельца такого поместья. И, восхищаясь его вкусом, Элизабет заметила, что эта обстановка не казалась излишне пышной и выглядела менее роскошной и в то же время более изящной, чем обстановка в Розингсе.
"И здесь-то я чуть было не стала хозяйкой! - размышляла Элизабет. - Я могла бы уже привыкнуть к этим комнатам! Вместо того чтобы осматривать их в качестве случайной посетительницы, я пользовалась бы ими как собственными, приветствуя тут в качестве своих гостей мистера и миссис Гардинер! Впрочем, нет, - спохватилась она, - это было бы невозможно. Дядя и тетя были бы для меня навсегда потеряны. Мне никогда не позволили бы их сюда пригласить".
Эта мысль пришла ей в голову как раз вовремя, избавив ее от чувства, чем-то похожего на сожаление.
Ей очень хотелось узнать у домоправительницы, в самом ли деле владелец поместья находится сейчас в отъезде, но у нее не хватало духу для прямого вопроса. Он был задан в конце концов мистером Гардинером. Отвернувшись, дабы скрыть беспокойство, Элизабет услышала, что миссис Рейнолдс ответила на него утвердительно, добавив при этом:
— Мы ждем его завтра. Он прибывает сюда вместе со своими друзьями.
Как обрадовалась Элизабет, что по какой-нибудь случайной причине они не отложили поездки!
В эту минуту миссис Гардинер позвала ее посмотреть на одну из картин. Элизабет приблизилась и среди прочих миниатюр над камином увидела портрет мистера Уикхема. Тетушка спросила ее с улыбкой, насколько он ей понравился. А подошедшая к ним домоправительница объяснила, что изображенный на портрете молодой человек - сын прежнего управляющего, воспитанный покойным мистером Дарси на свои средства.
— Сейчас он поступил в армию, - добавила она, - но боюсь, человек из него вышел совсем никудышный.
Миссис Гардинер, улыбаясь, взглянула на племянницу, но Элизабет не смогла ответить ей тем же.
— А вот, - сказала миссис Рейнолдс, показывая на другую миниатюру, - портрет нашего хозяина, очень похожий. Оба портрета были написаны одновременно, около восьми лет тому назад.
— Мне много рассказывали о мистере Дарси, - заметила миссис Гардинер, разглядывая миниатюру. - Судя по портрету, у него очень приятное лицо. Но, Лиззи, ты ведь и сама можешь судить о сходстве?
Уважение миссис Рейнолдс к Элизабет явно возросло, когда она услышала о ее знакомстве с владельцем Пемберли.
— Эта юная леди знает мистера Дарси?
— Совсем немного, - сказала Элизабет, покраснев.
— А не кажется ли вам, сударыня, что он необыкновенно хорош собой?
— О да, вы совершенно правы.
— Я не встречала другого такого красивого человека. Наверху в галерее вы увидите его портрет больших размеров и еще более удачный. Но мой покойный хозяин всегда любил эту комнату, и миниатюры висят здесь точно так, как они висели при нем. Он ими очень дорожил.
Это объясняло присутствие здесь портрета мистера Уикхема. Миссис Рейнолдс обратила их внимание на портрет мисс Дарси, написанный, когда ей было лишь восемь лет.
—  Ну, а мисс Дарси так же красива, как ее брат? - спросил мистер Гардинер.
— О несомненно, - воскликнула миссис Рейнолдс. - Она не уступит лучшим красавицам на свете. А как хорошо она воспитана! Она способна заниматься музыкой с утра до вечера. Рядом в комнате вы увидите только что привезенный для нее инструмент - подарок нашего хозяина. Завтра мы ее ждем вместе с мистером Дарси.
Любезные и непринужденные расспросы и замечания мистера Гардинера поощряли словоохотливость миссис Рейнолдс, которая то ли из тщеславия, то ли под влиянием искренней привязанности говорила о мистере Дарси и его сестре с видимым удовольствием.
— Ваш хозяин проводит в Пемберли много времени?
— Не так много, сэр, как мне бы хотелось. Но смею сказать, здесь протекает около половины его жизни. А мисс Дарси живет здесь каждое лето.
"Кроме того, - подумала Элизабет, - которое она провела в Рэмсгейте".
— Когда ваш хозяин женится, вы сможете видеть его гораздо больше.
— О да, сэр. Но мне неизвестно, когда это случится. Я не знаю никого, кто был бы хоть сколько-нибудь достоин стать его супругой.
Мистер и миссис Гардинер улыбнулись, а Элизабет, не удержавшись, заметила:
— Ваше мнение о нем, мне кажется, красноречиво говорит в его пользу.
— Я говорю одну только правду, - мои слова подтвердит всякий, кто знает мистера Дарси, - ответила миссис Рейнолдс.
Элизабет показалось, что это звучит довольно смело. С возрастающим изумлением она услышала, как миссис Рейнолдс добавила:- За всю жизнь он не сказал мне ни одного резкого слова. А ведь я знаю его с четырехлетнего возраста.
Эти слова особенно поразили Элизабет, настолько они шли вразрез с ее собственным представлением о Дарси. До сих пор она была уверена, что у него нелегкий характер. Ее внимание было обострено до предела. Ей не терпелось узнать еще что-нибудь, и она была от души благодарна мистеру Гардинеру, который сказал:
— Не многие люди заслуживают подобных похвал. Вы, должно быть, весьма счастливы, имея такого хозяина.
—  О да, сэр, мне в самом деле очень повезло. Лучшего мне не сыскать в целом свете. Но я всегда замечала, что добрые дети вырастают хорошими людьми. А он был самым отзывчивым, самым благородным мальчиком, какого мне когда-либо приходилось встречать.
Элизабет не отрывала от нее глаз.
"Неужели речь идет о мистере Дарси?" - думала она.
— Его отец славился своей добротой, - заметила миссис Гардинер.
—  О да, сударыня, вполне заслуженно. И сын его будет точь-в-точь такой же. Он так же добр к простым людям.
Элизабет слушала, удивлялась, сомневалась и горела желанием узнать больше. Миссис Рейнолдс не могла заинтересовать ее ничем другим. Все, что она рассказывала о сюжетах картин, размерах комнат и стоимости обстановки, Элизабет пропускала мимо ушей. Мистера Гардинера очень забавляло проявление фамильного тщеславия, объяснявшего, по его мнению, преувеличенные похвалы мистеру Дарси со стороны его домоправительницы. Поэтому он постарался снова вернуться к прежней теме. И пока они поднимались по длинной лестнице, миссис Рейнолдс с упоением продолжала описывать многочисленные достоинства своего патрона:
—  Это лучший землевладелец и лучший хозяин из всех когда-либо существовавших на свете, - сказала она. - Не то что теперешние беспутные молодые люди, которые думают только о себе. Не найдется ни одного его арендатора или работника, который бы не сказал о нем доброго слова. Кое-кто находит его слишком гордым. Но я этого не замечала. Этот упрек, мне кажется, вызван тем, что, в отличие от современных молодых людей, он не интересуется пустяками.
"В каком выгодном свете рисуют мистера Дарси эти слова!" - думала Элизабет.
—  Этот блестящий отзыв, - шепнула ей тетка, - не вполне сочетается с его отношением к нашему бедному другу.
— Быть может, нас по этому поводу ввели в заблуждение?
— Едва ли это могло случиться. Мы получили сведения из такого надежного источника.
Пройдя просторную переднюю во втором этаже, они заглянули в очаровательную гостиную с еще более легкой и изящной обстановкой, чем в нижних помещениях. Домоправительница объяснила, что эту комнату только на днях отделали, чтобы порадовать мисс Дарси, которой она прошлым летом особенно полюбилась.
— У нее и правда заботливый брат, - сказала Элизабет, подходя к одному из окон.
Миссис Рейнолдс заранее предвкушала восторг мисс Дарси при виде новой отделки.
— И это так на него похоже! - добавила она. - Все, что может доставить сестре хоть малейшее удовольствие, делается сейчас же. Он использует любую возможность.
Им оставалось осмотреть только картинную галерею и две или три большие спальни. В галерее оказалось немало прекрасных полотен, но Элизабет слабо разбиралась в живописи. И, устав от нее еще при осмотре первого этажа, она охотно принялась рассматривать более доступные и близкие ей карандашные наброски мисс Дарси.
Разглядывая множество семейных портретов, которые едва ли могли привлечь внимание постороннего, Элизабет искала среди них единственное лицо со знакомыми чертами. В конце концов оно бросилось ей в глаза, и она была поражена удивительным сходством портрета с мистером Дарси. На полотне была запечатлена та самая улыбка, которую она нередко видела на его лице, когда он смотрел на нее. Несколько минут Элизабет сосредоточенно в него вглядывалась. И, покидая галерею, она еще раз к нему подошла, услышав от миссис Рейнолдс, что портрет был написан еще при жизни прежнего хозяина.
В эту минуту Элизабет явно испытывала к оригиналу портрета более теплое чувство, чем когда-либо на протяжении их знакомства. Восторги миссис Рейнолдс не могли не произвести впечатления. Может ли что-нибудь звучать убедительнее, чем хвалебный отзыв разумной прислуги?
Она размышляла над огромной ответственностью за человеческие судьбы, которая возлагалась на Дарси его положением старшего брата, землевладельца, хозяина дома. Сколько мог он принести людям добра и зла! Сколько радостей и горестей находилось в его власти! Каждая черточка его характера, упоминавшаяся домоправительницей, располагала в его пользу. И, стоя перед полотном, с которого на нее смотрели его глаза, Элизабет думала о его чувстве с гораздо более глубоким участием, чем когда-либо прежде: она вспоминала, как пламенно признался он ей в своей любви, и старалась загладить в памяти неподобающую форму этого признания.
Когда были осмотрены все открытые для обозрения уголки дома, они снова сошли вниз и, распрощавшись с домоправительницей, оказались на попечении встретившего их около дверей холла садовника.
Спускаясь по газонам к реке, Элизабет обернулась, чтобы еще раз оглядеть здание. Мистер и миссис Гардинер тоже остановились. И пока первый высказывал предположение о времени постройки дома, из-за угла, по дорожке, которая вела к конюшне, вышел его владелец.
Между ними было всего двадцать ярдов, и он появился настолько внезапно, что избежать его взгляда было для Элизабет совершенно невозможно. Глаза их встретились, и лица обоих вспыхнули багровым румянцем. Мистер Дарси вздрогнул и сначала, казалось, оцепенел от изумления. Но, быстро придя в себя, он пошел к ним навстречу и заговорил с ней, хотя и не вполне владея собой, однако самым учтивым образом.
В первый момент Элизабет инстинктивно отвернулась и сделала несколько шагов в сторону. Но когда он с ней поравнялся, она растерянно остановилась и выслушала его приветствие. Если появление мистера Дарси и его сходство с только что виденным портретом недостаточно уверило ее спутников, что перед ними владелец поместья, то изумление, которое при виде хозяина изобразилось на лице садовника, подтвердило это с полной убедительностью.
Пока Дарси беседовал с их племянницей, они стояли поодаль. Не смея поднять глаза, совершенно ошеломленная, Элизабет бессознательно отвечала на любезные расспросы о своей семье. Ее поразило, насколько переменились, по сравнению с их последней встречей, его манеры. С каждой новой фразой она испытывала все возраставшее смущение. И несколько минут этого разговора, в течение которых она сознавала только, до чего неприлично было ей оказаться застигнутой в этом месте, стали самыми неловкими в ее жизни.
Мистер Дарси чувствовал себя не намного увереннее: в его словах не было обычной невозмутимости. Бессвязно повторяя вопросы о том, когда она покинула Лонгборн и сколько дней ей довелось провести в Дербишире, он явно обнаруживал свое смятение.
Под конец, не зная, что бы сказать еще, он замолк и, простояв с минуту в молчании, вдруг опомнился и пошел прочь.
Мистер и миссис Гардинер тотчас же подошли к Элизабет и выразили восхищение его внешностью. Однако, поглощенная своими мыслями, Элизабет едва ли расслышала их слова и шла за ними в полном молчании. От стыда и унижения она почувствовала себя совершенно подавленной.
Визит в Пемберли казался ей самым злосчастным, самым ошибочным шагом в ее жизни. Каким странным должен был показаться он мистеру Дарси! Как опозорена была бы она даже и не перед столь тщеславным человеком! Можно было подумать, что она намеренно постаралась снова оказаться у него на пути! Зачем она сюда приехала? И надо же было ему явиться за день до назначенного срока!
Достаточно им было выйти из замка всего на десять минут раньше, и он бы их не застал! Было ясно, что он прибыл сию минуту - только что соскочил с лошади или вышел из экипажа. И она снова и снова краснела, сознавая все неприличие ее появления в Пемберли. Но как изменилось поведение мистера Дарси! Чем это можно объяснить? Следовало удивляться, что он вообще стал с ней разговаривать. И разговаривать так учтиво, - осведомляться о ее близких!
Никогда еще он не говорил с ней так сердечно, без малейшего высокомерия, как при этой нежданной встрече. Насколько это отличалось от его последнего обращения к ней в Розингсе, когда он передал ей свое письмо! Элизабет не знала, что ей об этом думать и как все объяснить.
Они теперь шли по восхитительной тропинке у самой воды. С каждым шагом перед ними открывались все более красивые склоны, все более живописный вид на приближавшуюся лесную чащу. Однако Элизабет смогла снова воспринимать окружающий мир далеко не сразу. Машинально отвечая на повторные обращения мистера и миссис Гардинер или рассматривая заинтересовавшие их виды, она думала совсем о другом.
Ее мысленному взору представлялась та единственная, хоть и неизвестная комната дома, в которой должен был сейчас находиться мистер Дарси. Ей хотелось понять, какие мысли бродят у него сейчас в голове, что он о ней думает и сохранил ли к ней, вопреки всему, нежное чувство. Не был ли он так любезен только потому, что чувствовал себя здесь более свободно? Но в его голосе слышалось нечто такое, что нельзя было счесть за непринужденность. Было неясно - обрадовался ли он этой встрече или она его расстроила. Во всяком случае, он не отнесся к ней безразлично.
Замечания спутников по поводу ее рассеянного вида под конец вывели Элизабет из задумчивости и заставили ее взять себя в руки.
Они вошли в чащу и, на время расставшись с рекой, побрели вверх по склону холма. Там, где просветы между деревьями оставляли взору достаточный простор, открывался прекрасный вид на долину и противоположные покрытые лесом холмы, скрывавшие также некоторые излучины реки. Мистер Гардинер выразил желание обойти весь парк, но побоялся, что за одну прогулку это окажется им не под силу.
В ответ на его слова садовник с довольной усмешкой сказал, что им потребовалось бы пройти не меньше десяти миль. Это решило вопрос, и они двинулись дальше по избранному пути. Дорога снова пошла под гору. Пробравшись под низко склоненными деревьями, они опять спустились к сильно сузившейся в этом месте реке и пересекли ее по незамысловатому мостику, вполне гармонировавшему с окружающей природой. Рука человека чувствовалась здесь еще меньше, чем во всех виденных ими до сих пор уголках парка. И сжатая ущельем долина оставляла пространство только для потока и узкой, окаймленной кустарником дорожки. Элизабет очень хотелось обследовать течение реки. Но, внезапно сообразив, как далеко они отошли от дома, миссис Гардинер, которая не привыкла много ходить пешком, отказалась идти дальше и потребовала, чтобы они поскорее вернулись.
Племяннице пришлось подчиниться, и они пошли кратчайшим путем к оставленному ими на другом берегу экипажу. Двигались они, однако, не слишком быстро. Пристрастие мистера Гардинера к рыбной ловле, которое ему случалось удовлетворять весьма редко, заставляло их то и дело останавливаться, пока он разглядывал плещущуюся в реке форель или толковал с садовником о повадках этой рыбы.
Медленно бредя таким образом, они вдруг заметили направляющегося к ним мистера Дарси. Элизабет была изумлена почти так же, как тогда, когда он появился в первый раз перед домом. Благодаря тому что тропинка была не настолько скрыта деревьями, как на другом берегу, они увидели Дарси на таком расстоянии, чтобы успеть подготовиться к встрече. И, несмотря на свое удивление, Элизабет смогла собраться с мыслями, чтобы говорить с ним, если он в самом деле к ним подойдет, достаточно спокойно.
На секунду ей почудилось, что он все же предпочел свернуть в боковую просеку. Но это предположение просуществовало ровно столько времени, сколько потребовалось, чтобы он успел миновать скрывший его изгиб дороги. Тотчас после этого он предстал перед ними.
С первого взгляда она заметила, что он держится так же учтиво, как во время их встречи около дома. Стараясь быть столь же любезной, Элизабет выразила свое восхищение красотой местности. Но, повторив раза два "очаровательно" и "прелестно", она спохватилась, что в ее устах восхваления Пемберли могут получить неправильное истолкование, и, покраснев, внезапно умолкла.
Миссис Гардинер стояла поодаль, и мистер Дарси, воспользовавшись паузой, попросил Элизабет оказать ему честь и представить его своим друзьям. Такой учтивости она от него совершенно не ожидала. И, едва сдержав улыбку, она подумала, что Дарси ищет знакомства с людьми, против которых так восставала его гордость, когда он просил ее руки.
"Как должен будет он удивиться, - подумала она, - узнав, кто они такие! Он ведь предполагает, что они принадлежат к светскому обществу".
Тем не менее она сразу их познакомила. Сказав, что приходится Гардинерам племянницей, она искоса взглянула на Дарси, вполне допуская, что он постарается поскорее сбежать от столь неподходящей компании. Упоминание об их родственных связях, несомненно, застало его врасплох. Однако Дарси принял это сообщение достаточно мужественно и не только не сделал попытки удалиться, но даже пошел рядом, вступив с мистером Гардинером в оживленную беседу.
Элизабет не могла не испытывать удовлетворения, не могла не торжествовать. Как утешительно было сознавать, что он познакомился наконец с теми из ее родственников, за которых ей наверняка не придется краснеть! Вслушиваясь в их разговор, она радовалась каждой фразе своего дяди, каждому выражению, свидетельствовавшему о его уме, вкусе и превосходных манерах.
Беседа вскоре коснулась рыболовства, и она услышала, как мистер Дарси весьма любезным образом пригласил ее дядю во время их пребывания в Дербишире ловить рыбу в его имении. Одновременно он предложил снабдить его необходимыми снастями и показал наиболее удобные для ловли места. Миссис Гардинер, которая шла бок о бок с племянницей, бросила на нее изумленный взгляд.
Элизабет промолчала, но чувствовала себя необыкновенно довольной. Такое внимание, очевидно, проявлялось ради нее одной. Все это, однако, крайне ее удивляло, так что она не переставала себя спрашивать:
"Почему он так изменился? Чем это объясняется? Не может быть, чтобы это случилось из-за меня. Не может быть, чтобы ради меня он стал вести себя так учтиво! То, что я высказала ему тогда в Хансфорде, не могло повлиять на него так сильно! Не любит же он меня до сих пор?!"
В течение какого-то времени все шли в том же порядке: дамы - впереди, мужчины - в нескольких шагах сзади. Но после того как им пришлось спуститься к воде, чтобы взглянуть на какое-то занятное водяное растение, произошла некоторая перестановка. Миссис Гардинер, утомленная долгой прогулкой, почувствовала, что рука племянницы служит ей недостаточной опорой, и предпочла опереться на руку мужа. Мистер Дарси занял ее место рядом с Элизабет, и они двинулись дальше.
После некоторого молчания Элизабет заговорила первая. Ей хотелось объяснить, насколько она была уверена в его отсутствии, когда решилась посетить Пемберли. Поэтому она высказала свое удивление его неожиданным приездом.
— Ваша домоправительница, - прибавила она, - утверждала с уверенностью, что вы не приедете раньше завтрашнего утра, и то же самое нам сказали перед выездом из Бейкуэлла. Сегодня вас здесь не ждали.
Дарси подтвердил, что приехал в самом деле неожиданно, и объяснил это необходимостью встретиться с управляющим до прибытия своих друзей.
— Они приедут завтра утром, - продолжал он. - И вы найдете среди них старых знакомых - мистера Бингли и его сестер.
Элизабет ответила легким кивком. Мысли ее мгновенно перенеслись к тому времени, когда имя Бингли было произнесено между ними в последний раз. И, насколько она могла судить по выражению лица мистера Дарси, он думал о том же.
— Среди них будет еще одна особа, - продолжал он после некоторой паузы, - которая самым искренним образом хотела бы с вами познакомиться. Позволите ли вы мне, - или я прошу слишком многого, - представить вам, пользуясь вашим визитом в Лэмтон, мою сестру?
Такая просьба не могла не вызвать ее удивления. Было трудно понять, чем она ее заслужила. Однако было ясно, что мисс Дарси могла захотеть с ней познакомиться только под влиянием брата. Так или иначе Элизабет не видела в этом ничего дурного. И ей было радостно сознавать, что он не думает о ней плохо, несмотря на нанесенную ему обиду.
Теперь они шли молча, каждый глубоко погруженный в свои мысли. Состояние Элизабет нельзя было назвать приятным - об этом не могло быть и речи. Но она была польщена и тронута. Желание познакомить ее с мисс Дарси казалось особенно тонким комплиментом. Вскоре они намного опередили своих спутников. Когда они подошли к экипажу, мистер и миссис Гардинер отстали от них почти на четверть мили.
Дарси пригласил ее войти в дом, но она ответила, что не чувствует усталости, и оба остались стоять на лужайке. В подобных, располагающих к беседе обстоятельствах молчать было особенно неловко. Ей хотелось начать разговор, но любая возможная тема казалась запретной. Наконец, вспомнив, что в данный момент она является путешественницей, Элизабет упомянула о Мэтлоке и Давдейле, и они с большим увлечением начали обсуждать красоты Дербишира. Однако время и ее тетушка подвигались настолько медленно, что к концу этого tete-a-tete ей уже почти ничего не могло прийти в голову для поддержания разговора.
Когда Гардинеры наконец приблизились, он пригласил всех зайти в дом, чтобы немного закусить. Приглашение, однако, было отклонено, и они расстались самым любезным образом. Мистер Дарси помог обеим дамам сесть в экипаж, и, когда лошади тронулись, Элизабет увидела, как он медленно пошел по направлению к дому.
Мистер и миссис Гардинер не преминули высказать свои впечатления. Оба заявили, что мистер Дарси намного превзошел их ожидания.
— Он превосходно себя держит: по-настоящему учтиво и скромно, - сказал мистер Гардинер.
—  Конечно, в нем есть некоторая величавость, но она скорее относится к его внешности и нисколько его не портит, - заметила миссис Гардинер. - И я готова согласиться с его домоправительницей, что, хотя некоторые люди и считают его гордецом, сама я этого совсем не почувствовала.
— Особенно меня удивило его гостеприимство. По отношению к нам он был не просто вежливым, но, я бы сказал, подчеркнуто внимательным. А ведь для подобного внимания у него не было никакого повода: его знакомство с Элизабет было самым поверхностным.
— Разумеется, Лиззи, он уступает Уикхему, - добавила тетушка. - Вернее, у него не такая привлекательная внешность, хотя он совсем недурен. Но почему ты нам описала его таким чудовищем?
Элизабет оправдывалась как могла: она говорила, что он понравился ей гораздо больше, когда они встретились в Кенте, и что еще никогда он не казался ей столь приятным человеком, каким предстал перед ними в это утро.
— Возможно, он несколько взбалмошен, - заметил мистер Гардинер. - Этим вашим великим людям свойственна такая особенность. А потому я не собираюсь воспользоваться приглашением насчет рыбной ловли. Не то вдруг у него переменится настроение и мне придется убираться восвояси.
Элизабет видела, что они совершенно не разобрались в его характере, но не сказала ни слова.
— Посмотрев на него, - продолжала миссис Гардинер, - я бы никогда не подумала, что он способен обойтись с кем-нибудь так жестоко, как обошелся с бедным Уикхемом. Он вовсе не кажется злодеем, напротив, когда он разговаривает, у него около рта видны такие добрые складки. В его внешности чувствуется какое-то достоинство, с которым никак не вяжется представление о жестокости. А как горячо расхваливала его характер почтенная женщина, показывавшая нам дом! Я иногда еле удерживала улыбку. Должно быть, он щедрый хозяин и в глазах прислуги благодаря этому выглядит добродетельным во всех отношениях.
Элизабет почувствовала необходимость как-то оправдать его обращение с Уикхемом. И, соблюдая предельную осторожность, она объяснила им, что, по полученным от его родных сведениям, отношения Дарси с этим молодым человеком могли быть истолкованы совсем по-другому. Характер первого оказывался при этом не столь испорченным, а второго - не столь безупречным, как им представлялось в Хартфордшире. В подтверждение она изложила подробности связывавшей их злосчастной истории, не сказав, от кого она о ней узнала, но заверив, что на достоверность полученных ею сведений можно положиться.
Миссис Гардинер была поражена и опечалена. Но так как в это время они уже въехали в городок, в котором она провела свою юность, ее слишком часто стали отвлекать от разговора приятные воспоминания. То и дело показывая мужу памятные для нее места, она уже была не в состоянии думать о чем-то другом. И, несмотря на усталость от утренней прогулки, они сразу после обеда снова покинули гостиницу, чтобы навестить старых друзей, с которыми так приятно было провести вечер после многолетней разлуки.
События дня слишком взволновали Элизабет, чтобы она могла уделить много внимания новым знакомствам. И на протяжении вечера она была поглощена своими мыслями, удивляясь дружескому тону мистера Дарси, а еще больше - его намерению познакомить с ней свою сестру.
2010-07-19 18:44 Читать похожую статью
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • Контрольная работа
  • © Помощь студентам
    Образовательные документы для студентов.